Planted Cottonwoods / Photo: WBC

Planted Cottonwoods / Photo: WBC

The goals and objectives of Walker Basin Conservancy are stewardship and restoration driven. A top land stewardship priority includes soil conservation and vegetation efforts through the WBC Vegetation Program on lands where water has been purchased through NFWF’s Walker Basin Restoration Program.  This type of stewardship ensures that land from which water has been acquired does not create dust or weed problems for the local community, or cause impacts to the natural environment.

 

Placeholder table below - Still design modifications being made .

 Placeholder revegetation table

Placeholder revegetation table

 Revegetation Area / Photo: WBC

Revegetation Area / Photo: WBC

The major goals of the WBC Vegetation Program include mitigating soil loss, improving wildlife habitat, controlling noxious weeds, and restoring functional plant communities where appropriate. This is accomplished by a variety of land management activities, including establishing arid-land vegetation that can ultimately survive without supplemental irrigation. Working with the Smith and Mason Valley Conservation Districts, WBC works to vegetate the upland landscape in the Walker River Basin within Nevada. These uplands were historically dominated by native shrub communities with an understory or contiguous populations of native grasses.

 Revegetation Area / Photo: WBC

Revegetation Area / Photo: WBC

Prior to the onset of land and water acquisitions within the basin, NFWF understood the importance of caring for the land after the withdrawal of water to minimize the threat of noxious weed invasion and fugitive dust problems. To that end, NFWF dedicated funding for a land stewardship program that is intended to minimize potential problems by actively revegetating lands that will be impacted by the water acquisition program.  The WBC has assumed the role of actively revegetating and managing these lands. Species selected in an effort to reestablish native flora of the region include wild rose, fourwing saltbush, quailbush, buffaloberry, and big sagebrush in addition to a variety of perennial grass species and flowering forbs to target pollinators, such as sweet clover. Planting shrubs and grasses native to this region of the Great Basin ensures a healthier natural landscape for wildlife and resources, related habitat connectivity, and directly contributes to resolving fugitive dust problems within the community, which result from formerly cultivated lands (no longer in operation) sitting un-managed.