Land Conservation in the Walker Basin

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Water conservation means the conservation of water.

Land Conservation is a priority on lands where water has been purchased for the benefit of Walker Lake.  Primary restoration goals for stewardship activities address three main issues: fugitive dust abatement, soil stabilization and noxious weed control.  Improved habitat is addressed where appropriate and possible.  Establishing arid-land vegetation that can ultimately survive without supplemental irrigation is the long-term goal for the Conservancy.

Restoration is accomplished through two broad strategies: passive restoration and active facilitated restoration.  Passive restoration relies on minimizing disturbance, monitoring and controlling weeds to allow infilling and regeneration.  Active facilitated restoration uses techniques that help speed the process of natural regeneration.  Thereby, stabilizing the site while speeding up the process of vegetative community succession; the species that are initially planted at the site are not necessarily those that are ultimately desired in the longer term, but help to establish the conditions needed for high quality late-seral stage communities.

A common example of active facilitated restoration the Conservancy employs is planting grasses and then inter-planting ‘pods’ of shrubs. The grasses minimize dust and compete with agricultural weeds in the short term, and the shrubs become a seed source and expand into the restoration area while the grasses decrease as irrigation water is removed. Over time a plant community that more closely resembles the surrounding desert and river corridor habitats becomes established and can thrive without supplemental irrigation.

Restoration is accomplished through two broad strategies: passive restoration and active facilitated restoration.  Passive restoration relies on minimizing disturbance, monitoring and controlling weeds to allow infilling and regeneration.  Active facilitated restoration uses techniques that help speed the process of natural regeneration.  Thereby, stabilizing the site while speeding up the process of vegetative community succession; the species that are initially planted at the site are not necessarily those that are ultimately desired in the longer term, but help to establish the conditions needed for high quality late-seral stage communities.

 
 

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